Edinburgh Bookshelf

Edinburgh Past and Present


THE OLD TOWN. 25 in Parliament Square, is supposed to be under the stone shown in the Engraving.) The Edinburgh Reviewers-Jeffrey, Sydney Smith, Brougham, KNOWS GRAVE Dr. Thomas Brown, Francis Horner, and the rest,-are cultivating the Muses ,on a little oatmeal, moistened by not a littre usquebaugh. Walter Scott is getting up his Border MinstreZsy. Leyden is gulping down languages like Behemoth rivers. Thomas Campbell is completing the incubation of his PZeasures of Hope. Hector MacNeil is resting under the little laurels of his WiZZ a d l e a n and Mary of CasfZecary. Dr. John Jarnieson has come from Forfar to preside over an Anti-Burgher congregation in Nicolson Street, and to issue his stupendous Dictwmzy of the ScottzX hnpuge. Mrs. Grant of Laggan is publishing her Bters from fhe Mozintatits. James Grahame is singing with sweet though rather sepulchral notes his Sabbat/r and Birds of ScotZad. Mrs. Hamilton is brimful of her exquisite novel, 23~C offagerso f GZenbumL; and Mrs. Brunton has secretly prepared a surprise for the world, and her husband too, in her stirring and animated Se(f-ControZ. In the Edinburgh pulpit, Dr. John Inglis, Dr. Brunton, and other magnates, are propping up the Established Church, while in the Relief body Struthers of College Street is gathering together such crowds as have rarely been seen in Edinburgh before, and are not to be seen again till the advent of Chalmers, and is, by his sermon on the battle of Trafalgar, to electrify his audience as much as the news of the great victory had done, while Alison and afterwards Morehead and Sandford are sustaining the credit of the Episcopalian Church. But the period between the year 1815 and 1830 or 1835 may perhaps be called the culmination of Fdinburgh's intellectual- glory. During that time was commenced ihe immortal series of the Waverley Novels, in Iieu of, but a vast stride before, Scott's highly popular Poems. (The D
Volume 11 Page 43
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