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Book 10  p. 251
(Score 1.07)

CON TENTS. V
CHAPTER XIII.
THE DISTRICT OF RESTALRIG.
PAGE
Abbey Hill-Baron Norton-Alex. Campbell and 'I Albjm's Anthology "--Comely Gardens-Easter Road-St. Margaret's Wellxhurch
and Legend of St. Tnduana-Made Collegiate bv James 111.-The Mausoleum-Old Barons of Restalrig-The Logans, &c-
Conflict of Black Saturday-Residents of Note-First Balloon in Britain-Rector Adams-The Nisbeb of Craigantinnie and Dean
-The Millers-The Craixantinnie Tomb and Marbles-The Marionville Tragedy-The Hamlet of Jock's Lodge-Mail-bag Robberies
in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries-Piemhill House and Barracks. . . . . . . . . . . . . I 27
CHAPTER XIV.
PORTOBELLO.
Portobell~The Site before the Houses-The Figgate Muir--ctone Coffiqs-A Meeting with Cramwell-A Curious Race-Portobello Hut-
Robbers-William Jamieson's Feuing-Sir W. Scott and "The Lay "-Portobello Tower-Review of Yeomanry and Highlanders-
Hugh Miller-David Lamg-Joppa-Magdalene Bridge-Rrunstane House . . . . . . . . . . . . I43
CHAPTER XV.
LEITH WALK.
A Pathway in the 15th Century probable-Genera1 Leslie's Trenches-Repulse of Cramwell-The Rood Chapel-Old Leith Stazes-Propsal
for Lighting the Walk-The Gallow Lea-Executions there-The Minister of Spott- Five Witches-Five Covenanters-The Story of
their Skulls-The Murder of Lady Baillie-The Effigies of "Johnnie Wilkes" . . . . . . . . , . . 150
CHAPTER XVI.
LEITH WALK (conchfed).
East Side-Captain Haldane of the Tabernacle-New Road to Haddington -Windsor Street-Mrs H. Siddons -Lovers' Loan-Greenside
House-Andrew Macdonald. the Author of" Vimonda "-West Side-Sir J. Whiteford of that Ilk-Gayfield House-Colonel Crichton
--Prince Leopold-Lady Maxwell-Lady Nairne-SFr;ngfield-McCulloch of Ardwell and Samuel Foote . . . . . ' 157
CHAPTER XVII.
LEITH-HISTORICAL SURVEY.
Origin of the Name-Boundaries of South and North Leith-Links of North Leith-The Town frrst mentioned in History--King Robert's
Charter-Superiority of the Logans and Magistrates of Edinburgh-Abbot Ballantyne's Bridge and Chapel-Newhaven given to
Edinburgh by Jam- 1V.-The Port of 153c-The Town Burned by the English . . . . , . . . . . - . 164
CHAPTER XVIII.
LEITH-HISTORICAL SURVEY (continued).
The Great Siege-Arrival of the French-The Fortifications-Re-capture of Inchkeith-The Town Invested-Arrival of the English Fleet
and Army-Skirmishes-Opening of the BatteriesFailure of the Great Assault-Queen Regent's Death-Treaty of Peace-Relics of
thesiege . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .r7o
CHAPTER XIX.
LEITH-HISTORICAL SURVEY (catinued).
rhc Fortifications demolished-Landing of Queen Mary-Leith Mortgaged-Edinburgh takes Military Pasession of it-A Convention-A
Plague-James VI. Departs and Returns -Witches-Cowrie Con%pkacy-The Union Jack-Pirates-Taylor the Water Poet-
A Fight in the Harbour-Death of Jamer VI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , 178 ... TENTS. V CHAPTER XIII. THE DISTRICT OF RESTALRIG. PAGE Abbey Hill-Baron Norton-Alex. Campbell and 'I ...

Book 6  p. 395
(Score 1.07)

OUTLINE OF
T H E GEOLOGY O F E D I N B U R G H
AND ITS NEIGHBOURHOOD.
BY PROFESSOR GEIKIE, LLD., F.R.S.
FEW parts of the British Islands have been more frequently the subjects
of geglogical description than the district of which. Edinburgh forms the
centre. From the time when its igneous rocks were studied by Hutton, and
made to bear their testimony to the Vulcanist theory of the earth, down to
the present day, books, memoirs, and notices have appeared in a continuous
stream, until it might be thought that hardly anything more can remain to be
said or written on the subject. And yet, as each year passes, new glimpses
are opened up into aspects of geology which our fathers never dreamt of,
and doubtlqss, after all the living geologists and writers have passed away,
succeeding generations will find the rocks and their story still inexhaustible.
But though countless points of detail remain to be worked out, the general
outline of the geological history of this region can now be'traced with
tolerable precision: Such an outline, in language intelligible to the nonscientific
reader, is all that can be attempted, or indeed seems desirable,' in
these pages.
Geological history is at the best confessedly imperfect, even when based
upon the evidence drawn from the study of a whole country, or an entire
continent, or of the globe itself. Still more fragmentary must it be when it
relates only to a limited region. Under the most favourable circumstances
it may lack most or all of the introductory chapters; a few scattered pages,
as it were, may be all that relate the events of one of the longest and most
momentous geological periods ; the narrative will suddenly break off in the
middle of an interesting epoch, and when it resumes again we find that it
deals with a totally different and far more recent series of events. From the
T ... OF T H E GEOLOGY O F E D I N B U R G H AND ITS NEIGHBOURHOOD. BY PROFESSOR GEIKIE, LLD., F.R.S. FEW ...

Book 11  p. 204
(Score 1.06)

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Book 10  p. 388
(Score 1.06)

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Book 10  p. 55
(Score 1.03)

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Book 10  p. 434
(Score 1.03)

272 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [High Street
lawyer and judge. Admitted an advocate at the
early age of nineteen, he obtained a full share of
practice, and the rooms of his mansion in Elphinstone
Court were frequently crowded byhis clients;
but having gained a cause in which the celebrated
Lockhart (Lord Covington) was the opposing
counsel, that eminent barrister, in bitter chagrin at
his signal defeat, styled him ?a presumptuous
boy.? Young Wedderburn?s reply was so terribly
sarcastic as to draw upon him a severe rebuke from
England, resided here while practising at the
Scottish Bar. He was born in East Lothian, in
1733, where his great-grandfather, Sir Peter Wedderburn
of Gosford, was a man of influence in the
reign of Charles II., and rose to be an eminent
courts for ever, was called to the English bar in
1753, and soon gained fresh fame as counsel for
the great Lord Clive ; and in I 768-9 his eloquence
in the famous Douglas cause won him the notice
of Lord Camden and the friendship of the Earls of
Bute and Mansfield. He sat in the Commons as
member for the Inverary Burghs, and for Bishop?s
Castle, and in 1780 was raised to the British peerage
as Lord Loughborough, in the county of
Leicester. In April, 1783, he united with Lord
one of the judges, on which he threw off his gown,
and declared that never again would he plead in a
place where he was subjected to insult.
A11 unaware of the brilliant future that awaited
him, with great regret he quitted the Scottish
ELPHINSTONE COURT. ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [High Street lawyer and judge. Admitted an advocate at the early age of nineteen, he ...

Book 2  p. 272
(Score 1.03)

......

Book 10  p. 40
(Score 1.02)

280 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. . [High Street.
?capital already created under the last charter is
L;~OO,OOO stock, making the existing capital
I,OOO,OOO, and there still remains unexhausted
the privilege to create L500,ooo more stock
.whenever it shall appear to be expedient to coinplete
the capital to the full amount conceded in
the charter-a success that the early projectors of
the first scheme, developed in Tweeddale?s Close,
could little have anticipated.
The British Linen Company for a long series
of years has enjoyed the full corporate and other
privileges of the old chartered banks of Scotland
; and in this capacity, along with the Bank of
Scotland and the Royal Bank of Scotland, alone is
specially exempted in the Bank Regulation Act for
Scotland, from making returns of ?the proprietors?
names to the Stamp Office.
In the sixth year of the 19th century Tweeddale
House became the scene of a dark event ? which
ranks among the gossips of the Scottish capital
with the Icon Basilike, or the Man with the Iron
Mask.?
About five in the evening of the 13th of November,
I 806, or an hour after sunset, a little girl whose
family lived in the close, was .sent by her mother
with a kettle to get water for tea from the Fountain
Well, and stumbling in the dark archway over
something, found it to be, to her dismay, the body
of a man just expiring. On an alarm being raised,
the victim proved to be William Begbie, the
messenger of the British Linen Company Bank, a
residenter in the town of Leith, where that bank was
the first to establish a branch, in a house close to
the cpper drawbridge. On lights being brought,
a knife was found in his heart, thrust up to the
haft, so he bled to death without the power of
uttering a word of explanation. Though a sentinel
of the Guard was always on duty close by, yet he
saw nothing of the event.
It was found that he had been robbed of a
package of notes, amounting in value to more than
four thousand pounds, which he had been conveying
from the Leith branch to the head office. The
murder had been- accomplished with the utmost
deliberation, and the arrangements connected with
it displayed care and calculation. The weapon
used had a broad thin blade, carefully pointed,
with soft paper wrapped round the hand in such a
manner as to prevent any blood from reaching the
person of the assassin, and thus leading to his
detection.
For his discovery five hundred guineas were
offered in vain ; in vain, too, was the city searched,
while the roads were patrolled; and all the evidence
attainable amounted to this :-? That Begbie, in
proceeding up Leith Walk, had been accompanied
by a ?man,? and that about the supposed time of
the murder ?a man? had been seen by some chi\-
dren to run out of the close into the street, and
down Leith Wynd. . . . . There was also reason
to believe that the knife had been bought in a shop
about two o?clock on the day of the murder,
and that it had been afterwards ground upon a
grinding-stone and smoothed upon a hone.?
Many persons were arrested on suspicion, and
one, a desperate character, was long detained in
custody, but months passed on, and the assassination
was ceasing to occupy public -attention, when
three men, in passing through the grounds of
Eellevue (where now Drummond Place stands) in
August, 1807, found in the cavity of an old wall, a
roll of bank notes that seemed to have borne exposure
to the weather. The roll was conveyed to
Sheriff Clerk Rattray?s office, and found to ?contain
L3,ooo in large notes of the money taken from
Begbie. The three men received Lzoo from the
British Linen Company as the reward of their
honesty, but no further light was thrown upon the
murder, the actual perpetrator of which has never,
to this hour, been discovered, though strong suspicions
fell on a prisoner named Mackoull in 1822,
after he was beyond the reach of the law.
This man was tried and sentenced to death by
the High Court of Justiciary in June, 1820, for
robbery at the Paisley Union Bank, Glasgow, and
was placed in the Calton gaol, where he was respited
in August, and again in September, ?during his
majesty?s pleasure ? (according to the Edinburgh
Week(yjournal), and where he died about the end
of the year. In a work published under the title
of ?The Life and Death of James Mackoull,?
there was included a document by Mr. Denovan,
the Bow Street Runner, whose object was to prove
that Mackoull aZiis Moffat, was the assassin of
Begbie, and his statements, which are curious, have
thus been condensed by a local writer in 1865 :-
? Still, in the absence of legal proof, there is a
mystery about this daring crime which lends a sort
of romance to its daring perpetrator, Mr. Denovan
discovered a man in Leith acting as a teacher, who
in 1806 was a sailor-boy belonging to a ship then
in the harbour. On the afternoon of the murder
he was carrying up some smuggled article to a friend
in Edinburgh, when he noticed ? a tall man carrying
a yellow coloured parcel under his arm, and a genteel
man, dressed in a black coat, dogging him.?
He at once concluded that the man with the parcel
was a smuggler, and the other a custom-house
oficer. Fearful of detection himself, he watched
their manmavres with considerable interest. He lost ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. . [High Street. ?capital already created under the last charter is L;~OO,OOO stock, ...

Book 2  p. 280
(Score 1.01)

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Book 10  p. 298
(Score 1)

92 QUEENSFERRY TO MUSSELBURGH.
~
Its harbour is its great attraction. A finer or roomier is rarely to be found
anywhere; certainly not on the Firth. With an extent of pierage of over
1700 feet in length, and from 80 to 160 in breadth ; four pairs of jetties, each
extending go feet at regular intervais ; two slips, 325 feet each, to facilitate
the shipping and landing of cattle and heavy goods.at all states of the tide;
a high solid wall cleft with short thoroughfares, trending along the middle of
the esplanade; the whole being enclosed by a strong massive breakwater
running out on the west about three-fourths of a mile from the pier, and on
the east to a distance somewhat less, curving in a demicircle, and terminating
on a line with the pier-head, so as to Ieave an entrance of considerable breadth
-it affords not only a safe place to haven in, but is furnished, at the same
time, with every convenience and mechanical appliance for the speedy loading
GRANTON PIER. LEITH PIER.
and unloading of the numerous vessels which frequent it. Let us add that
it is the principal ferry from Edinburgh to Fife, vid the North British Railway,
and fiom which steamers pIy regularly to and from London, Aberdeen,
and Stirling. This harbour, begun in ~835,p artially opened in 1838, and
completed in 1845, was erected at a cost of &io,ooo.
To the west there is a hamlet of rather humble dwellings, built by the Duke
for the accommodation of his work-people; while to the east, again, there is a
village of cottages of a much better class, and two stories high, and which are
likewise tenanted by the empZuyis of the harbour, with here and there a house
of a more aspiring or pretentious character, occupied by the grocer, the baker, ... QUEENSFERRY TO MUSSELBURGH. ~ Its harbour is its great attraction. A finer or roomier is rarely to be ...

Book 11  p. 145
(Score 1)

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Book 10  p. 248
(Score 0.97)

......

Book 9  p. 169
(Score 0.96)

vi OLD APU'D NEW EDINBURGH.
CHAPTER XXII.
ST. ANDREW SQUARE.
PAGE
St. Andrew Sq-Lst .of Early R e s i d e n u t Bomwlaski-Miss Gordon of CLuny-SconiSh W d m ' Fund-Dr. A. K. Johnstoo
--Scottish Provident Institution-House in which Lord Bmugham was Bom-Scottish Equitable Society-Charteris of Amisfield-
Douglas's Hotel-Sk Philip Ainslie-British Linen Company-National Bank--Royal Baulc-The Melville and Hopetoun Monuments
-Ambm's Tavern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I66
CHAPTER XXIII.
CHARLOTTE S Q U A R E ,
Charlotle Sq-Its Early OccuPantgSu John Sinclair, B a r t - b o n d of that Ilk-Si Wdliam Fettes-Lard chief Commissioner Adam
-Alexander Dimto-St. George'r Church-The Rev. Andrew Thomson-Prince ConSmt's Memorial-The Parallelogram of the first
New Town. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -172
CHAPTER XXIV.
ELDER STREET-LEITH STREET-BROUGHTON STREET.
Elder Street--Leith Street-The old "Black BuU"-Margarot-The Theatre Royal-Its Predecessors on the same Site-The Circus-
C o d s Rooms-The Pantheon-Caledonian Thoaue--Adelphi Theatre-Queen's Theatre and Open House-Burned and Rebuilt-
~ t . wary's chapel-~ishop Cameron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
CHAPTER XXV.
THE VILLAGE AND BARONY OF BROUGHTON.
Bmghton-The Village and Barmy-The Loan-Bmughton first mentioned-Feudal Superio+Wttches Burned-Leslie's Headquarters
-Gordon of Ellon's Children Murdered-Taken Red Hand-The Tolbooth of the Burgh-The Minute Books-Free Burgews-
Modern Ch& Meted in the Bounds of the Barony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .r80
CHAPTER XXVI.
THE NORTHERN NEW TOWN.
Picardy PI-Lords Eldm and CDig-Su David Milm--Joho AbcrcmmbitLord Newton--cOmmissioner Osborne-St. PauPs Church
-St. George's Chapel-Wib Douglas, Artist-Professor Playfair-Gcned Scott of BellencDrummond Place-C K. Sharpe of
Hoddam-Lard Robertson-Abercmmbie Place and Heriot Row-Miss Femer-House in which H. McKenzie died-Rev. A. Aliin
-Great King Street-Sir R Chrii-Sir WillLm Hamilton-Si William Allan--Lord Colonsay, Lc. . . . . . . . 185
CHAPTER XXVII.
THE NORTHERN NEW TOWN (codu&d).
AdrnLal Fairfax-Bishop Terrot-Brigadier Hope-Sir T. M. Brisbam-Lord Meadowbank-Ewbank the R.S.A-Death of Professor
Wilson-Moray Place and its Distria-Lord President Hope-The Last Abode of Jeffrey-Bamn Hume and Lord Moncrieff-
Fom Street-Thomas Chalmers, D.D.-St. Colme Street-Cap& Basil Hall--Ainslie Place-Dugald Stewart-Dean Ramsay-
Great Stuart Slreet--Pmfessor Aytwn--Mk Graharn of DuntrooPLord Jerviswoodc . . . . . . . . . . I98
CHAPTER XXVIII.
THE WESTERN NEW TOWN-HAYMARKET-DALRY-FOUNTAINBRIDGE.
Maithd Street and Shandwick Place-The Albert Institute--Last Residence of Sir Wa'ta Smtt in Edinburgh-Lieutenant-General
DundatMelville Street-PatricL F. Tytler--Manor Piace-St. M q ' s Cathedral-The Foundation Ud-Its Si and Aspxt-
Opened for Srrsice--The Copstone and Cross placed on the Spire-Haymarket Station-Wmta Garden-Donaldson's Hospital-
Castle Te-Its Churches-Castle Barns-The U. P. Theological Hall-Union Canal-Fkt Boat Launched-Dalry-The Chieslies
-The Caledoniau Dstillery-Foun&bridg=-Earl Grey Street-Professor G:J. Bell-The Slaughter-ho-Baii Whyt of Bainfield
-Nd British India Rubber Works-Scottish Vulcanite CompanpAdam Ritchie . . . . . . . . . . . . Z q ... OLD APU'D NEW EDINBURGH. CHAPTER XXII. ST. ANDREW SQUARE. PAGE St. Andrew Sq-Lst .of Early R e s i d e n u t ...

Book 4  p. 388
(Score 0.96)

Well from Restalrig, where it had been all hut
buried under the workshops of the North British
Railway ; but now a limpid perennial rill from the
Craigs flows into its ancient basin, the Gothic archway
to which is closed by an open iron gate.
The old solitude and amenity of the Hunter's
Bog, after 1858, were destroyed by the necessary
erection of four rifle ranges, two of 300 yards, and
two of 600 yards, for the use of the garrison and
DUDDINGSTON CHURCH (INTERIOR).
volunteers, and the construction of two unornamental
powder magazines. The danger signal is
always hoisted in !he gorge known as the Hause ;
the rocky ridge named the Dasses overlooks these
ranges on the east.
Leaving the Echoing Rock, an isolated eminence,
and following the old road round the hill,
under Samson's Ribs, a superb range of pentagonal
greenstone columns sixty feet long by five in
dkmeter, the Fox's Holes, and the rugged stony
slope named the Sclyvers, we come to a lofty
knoll named the Girnel Craig, and another named
the Hangman's Craig or Knowe, from the following
circumstance. About the reign of Charles II.,
the office of public executioner was taken by a
reduced gentleman, the last member of an old
88
reprobate could not altogether forget his former
tastes and habits. He would occasionally resume
the garb of a gentleman, and mingle in the parties
of citizens who played at golf in the evenings on
Bruntsfield Links. Being at length recognised,
he was chased from the ground with shouts of execration
and loathing, which affected him so much
that he retired to the solitude of the King's Park,
and was next day found dead at the bottom of a
precipice, over which he is supposed to have thrown
himself in despair. The rock was afterwards
called the Hangman's Grae."
The deep gorge between it and the Sclyvers is
named the Windy Goule, and through it winds the
ancient path that leads direct to the hamlet of
Duddingston, which, with the loch of that name,' ... from Restalrig, where it had been all hut buried under the workshops of the North British Railway ; but now ...

Book 4  p. 313
(Score 0.93)

urgh Castle.] THE ROYAL LODGING. 77
for woodwork in the ? Gret Ha? windois in the
Castell, gret gestis and dowbill dalis for the myd
? chalmer, the king?s kechin, and the New Court
kechin in David?s Toure,? and for the Register
House built in 1542 by ?John Merlyoune,? who
first paved the High Street by order of James V.
On the east side of the square is the old palace,
or royal lodging, in which many stirring events
have happened, many a lawless deed been done,
where the longest line of sovereigns in the British
Isles dwelt, and manv have been born and
gorgeous landscape is spread out, reaching almost
to the ancient landmarks of the kingdom, guarded
on the far east by the old keep of Craigmillar, and
on the west by Merchiston Tower.? Besides the
hall in this edifice there was another in the fortress ;
for among the items of the High Treasurer?s accounts,
in 1516, we find for flooring the Lord?s
James VI. was unable to take with him to England
-lay so long hidden from view, and where they are
now exhibited daily to visitors, who number several
thousands every meek. The room was greatly
improved in 1848, when the ceiling was repaired
with massive oak panelling, having shields in bold
relief, and a window was opened to the square.
Two barriers close this room, one a grated door of
vast strength like a small portcullis.
In this building Mary of Guise died in 1550,
and a doomay, bearing the date of 1566, gives
1 have died. It is a handsome edifice, repaired so
~ lately as 1616, as a date remains to show ; but its
octagonal tower, square turrets and battlements,
? were probably designed by Sir James Hamilton
of Finnart, the architect to James V. A semioctagonal
tower of considerable height gives access
to the strongly vaulted and once totally dark room
EDINBURGH, FROM THE KING?S BASTION, 1825. (After EwJank.) ... Castle.] THE ROYAL LODGING. 77 for woodwork in the ? Gret Ha? windois in the Castell, gret gestis and ...

Book 1  p. 77
(Score 0.92)

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Book 10  p. 463
(Score 0.91)

of 6 1 0 each. The benefits of the endowments are
still destined to burgesses, their wives or children
not married, nor under the age of fifty years.? Ten
others have pensions of 6 1 0 each out of the funds
I
whole area occupied by the church and collegiate
buildings of the Holy Trinity was then included
in the original termini of the. Edinburgh and
Glasgow, the North British, the Edinburgh, Perth,
GROUND PLAN OF TRINITY COLLEGE CHURCH, 1814
following succinct account in the Scofs Magazine
for 1805:-
?In 1741 Captain Alexander Horn, of thecity of
London, by his last will bequeathed &3,500, old
and new South Sea Annuities, to be disposed of at
the discretion of the Lord Provost, Bailies, Dean
of Guild, and Treasurer of the city of Edinburgh,
on account of their early appearance and noble
stand in the cause of liberty (was this a reference
to the Porteous mob ?) as follows :-The interest
of &1,5oo on Christmas-day yearly, to such day
labourers of Edinburgh as by the inclemency of the
weather may be set idle and reduced to want;
interest of &I,OOO to day labourers as aforesaid,
in the Potter Row, Bristo, and West Port; and
I
boundary-wall of its garden, in which he shows
parterres and three rows of large trees, and also a
square lantern and vane above the roof of the large
hall; and in Edgar?s map, a hundred years later,
the waters of the loch came no farther eastward
than the line of the intended North Bridge, between
which and the hospital lay the old Physic Gardens.
?Its demolition brought to light many curious
evidences of its former state,? says Wilson. .?? A
beautiful large Gothic fireplace, with clustered
columns and a low, pointed arch, was disclosed in
she north gable, and many rich fragments of Gothic
ornament were found built into the walls, remains
no doubt of the original hospital buildings, used in
the enlargement and repair of the college.? The ... 6 1 0 each. The benefits of the endowments are still destined to burgesses, their wives or children not ...

Book 2  p. 308
(Score 0.91)

......

Book 8  p. v
(Score 0.91)

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Book 8  p. 554
(Score 0.9)

EDINBURGH PAST AND PRESENT.
Seton, in which James the Sixth was ' graciously pleased to rest himselfe,' the
day on which he journeyed from Holyrood to London, to take possession of
the English Crown.' With the following allusion to that touching incident
Tytler concludes his Hidory of ScotZand:--' As the monarch passed the
House of Seton, near Musselburgh, he was met by the funeral of the Earl of
Winton, a nobleman of high rank; which, with its. solemn movement and
sable trappings, occupied the road, and contrasted strangely and gloomily
with the brilliant pageantry of the royal cavalcade. The Setons were one
of the oldest and proudest families of Scotland; and (the father of) that
Lord whose mortal remains now passed by, had been a faithful adherent of
the King's mother: whose banner he had never deserted, and in whose
cause he had suffered exile and proscription, The meeting was thought
ominous by the people. It appeared, to their excited imagination, as if the
moment had amved when the aristocracy of Scotland was about to merge in
that of Great Britain j as if the Scottish nobles had finished their career of
national glory, and this last representative of their race had been arrested on
THE ROUNDLE.
his road to the grave, to bid farewell to the last of Scotland's kings. As the
mourners moved slowly onward, the monarch himself, participating in these
melancholy feelings, sat down by the wayside, on a stone still pointed out to
the historical pilgrim ; nor did he resume his progress till the gloomy procession
had completely disappeared.'
While Seton Church and Winton House are both about three miles beyond
the eastern border of Midlothian, Niddry Castle, in Linlithgowshireanother
possession of the Seton famiIy-is within a still shorter distance of its
western boundary. Prettily situated on a tributary of the Almond Water, a
The cut of the Roundle in
the text is from a sketch made in 1824. Both the Roundle and the adjoining road were slightly
altered when the North British Railway was constructed in 1845.
1 Si Richard Maitland's Hisfmy of firc Uosrsc of Sqtoun, p. 60. ... PAST AND PRESENT. Seton, in which James the Sixth was ' graciously pleased to rest himselfe,' the day ...

Book 11  p. 121
(Score 0.89)

GENERAL INDEX. 371
Black Watch, 11. 89, 138, 149, 179.
Black Wigs ClLb, 111. 123
Blackwood, Hnilie, 111. 15
Blackwood, William, I. 157, 291,
11. 139, 141, 142 ; the saloon in
his establinhment, 11. * 141 ; his
rrsidence, 111. 50
BfacA-wood's Mapasiw, 1. 339, 11.
322, 111. 195 288
23; ;Fa# ;2; ;7;g; 1.g WirZtors
11.140 IIP. 74
Blair,' Sir Jdmes Hunter, Lord
Provost, I. 179, 373, 376, 11. 283,
111. 89
Blair of Avontoun. Lord President.
236, 2 , II:27, 29, 120, 161, 271,
Blair Street, I. 245, 376, 11. 231,
Blarquhan Laird of 111. 36
BIair's Cl&, I. 65. & 11. 329 ;the
Duke of Gordon's house, 1. *p
Blairs of Balthayock, Tom-house
ofthe 11. 139
Blanc, kippolyte J., architect, 111.
38
Bland, the comedian, I. 342, 343
Blaw Wearie 111. 305
Bkis-sifwr, ?he gratuity, 11. 290,
383, 119. 45, 1 3 6 ~ 2 ~
Zj8,III. I
291
Blew Stone The I. 79
Blind Schdl, Cdigmillar, 11. 336
Blockhouse of St. Anthony. Leith.
111. 222, "23
J'Blue Blanket," The, I. 34, '36,
43, 11. 262, 278, 111. 55
Blumenreich, Herr, 111.88
Blyth's Close, 1. ga, 111. 66
Bmk's Land, West Port, I. 224
Boar Club The 111. IW
Board of Manuiactnres, 11. 8 3 4 6 ,
Body-snatchers Early 11. 1.w
B o ~ l l y , R o d n ci& near, 111.
Bo%l?yTower 111. 326 "328
Bonham, Sir Galter. II.'57
Bonkel Sir Edward I. 304
Bonnet'birds' club', 111.123
Bonnet-makers The 11. 265
Bonnington, n&r Le'ith, 11.~5,III.
W. ,306 ; view in, 111. * 96
Bonntngton House, 111. 88, 91,
*93, 147
Bonnington Mill, 111. 90, 247
Bonniugton Road, l I I . 8 8 , 1 2 8 , 1 ~ ,
Bonnington Sugar-refining Com-
Bonnyhaugh 111.90 gr
Bordeaux, &c de,Hr Holyrood,
Boreland homas the pcssessor of
the k&g$ stable, 11. 225; his
house I. * 80 1I.a25,n6
Bore-s&e or hare-stone, The, I.
326, 111. 28
Bomwlaski, ;he '8o?i;h dwarf, 11.
166.167
Borthwick, Lord, I. 40, 262, 11.383,
Borthwick, Jam- 11. 383
Borthwick's Close, I. 190, 211, 242
BosweIl, Sir Alexander, 1.173.182,
88, 92, 186
'7'1 '84
pany, Leith, 111. 91. 236
11. 78, 7%
Ill. 348
2x39 243.258
101, 18% 299911. 66, 143 255 339
ifs9 ; Lord hlacaulay s :pinion 01
his father and mother, 'jq; o n.wn's visit to Edinburgh,
I. z 9, IIL.57, 291, 35a
Bormll Raj, Wardte, Ill. 308
Boswell's Court, I.
Botanical gardenq, %e, I. 362,363,
Bothwell, Earfs of,' I. 94 122, 168,
Bo=vell, Jam=, I. 6 8 3 , 97, 98, 99,
111. 159, 161 162 163
196, 106, m7, 209, 2 1 0 ~ 2 4 ~ ~ 258,
259, 266, 276, 298, 3741 11. 61, 71,
72 111. 3 6,7, 52, 6 1 , ~ ~ 174,
33; ; Lord fi arnlefs murder 111.
3-7 * marruge of Queen kary
to the Earl of, I. 219. 11. 71,
262; how Bothwell attracted the
Queen's notice, 11. 102
Rothwell, Adam, Bishop of Orkney,
I. 116, q, 11. 48, 49, 71,
181, 111. 35, 98
Bothwell, ohn Lord, 11. 49
Hothwell, Air Francis, 111. 35
Hothwell, ohn I 47 158
Hothwell AichArd, PAvost of Kirk-
Bothwell of Glencorse, Henry, I. pa
Bothwell Bridge, 11. 39, 87. 375
Bottle House Company, Leith, 111.
Bough, Samuel, the artist, 11. 86,
Boulder, Gigantic, 11. 312
Bourse, The, Leith, 111. 231; its
other names, ib.
Bower, the historian of Edinburgh
University, 111. 8, 9. 10. 11, 16,
of-Fielh, 111. 2
239
Ill. 68
. .
18 19, 308
BokFoot, The, 11. 13'
Rowfoot Well. I. 310 11. 233
Bowles, Caroline, 11.'-
Boyd, Lord, 111. 174, 180
Boyd Sir Thomas nmtewn, Lord
Bo d, J o k , Slaubhter of'the ruf-
PrdVOSt 11. 284 i11.88 288
Ln. 11. a
4 4 $1, 4 ,'326, a;i, 347, fi.- . "Braid dugh Somewilk of the
Writes " 1. 315, 16
Braid, L i r d of, IIt. 49
Braid The river 111. 143, 322
Braid'Village o< 111. to, 113 ;ex*
c d o n near, 1iI. 40; its historical
asxiations, 111. 41
Braid's Row 111. 75
Braidsbum, 'I. 326, 111. 49, 61, 327
Brand, Sir Alexander, I. m3, 378,
Brandof Baberton, Alexander, 111.
Brandfield P h 11.218
Brandfield Stree; 11. ar
Braxfield, Lord, i, 173, 11. 152,153,
Bread. Sale of. determined bv law.
11.21
334
339 . . 11.;80 '
Brea&lbe Earlof 1.378 I11 146
Breadalbani Marqkis of,'II.'86;
Breadalbme Stdet. Leith. 111. ax.
Marchion& of 11. zog
. . _ _ 236
II.84,111.2 9
Breakwater,TheNewhaven III.303
Bremner, David, 1. 283, 384,
Brewers, The &inburgh, 11. 68
Brewster, Sir David, 1.379,II. 140,
f57,III. q, 242: statueof 111.24
Brilxs, Acceptance of, by'judgea
and others, 1. 163, 164, 167,169
Brickfield, 111. 144
Bridewell, The, 11. 106, IT
Bridge-end, 111. 58
Bridges, Sir Egerton, I. 273
Bridges David, cloth merchnot,
Bright, John, M.P., 11. 284
Brighton Chapel, 11. 326
Brighton Place, Portobello 111.148
Hrlsbane, Sir T., Father d 11. 199
Bristo, 11. 135, 267, w, Ilt. 94
Bristo Park 11. 326
Bristo Port,'I. 38, 11. 234, 267, 316,
T3t.3249 325, 3 4 '32% 3Pp 379,
Brisro Street, I. 335, 11. 326.327,
I. I ~ ' - I I O ; his wife, I. 110
11. 94, 156
British Convention, The, 11. 236 ;
British Linen Company, I. a79.280,
11s governors and patrons, 1. 279
British Linen Co.'s Bank, Edinburgh
11 170 171, 172; at
Leith'III'z38 '23
British h e ; Hail, &nongate, 11.
31, 33, 83
xilure of its members, id.
355, 11. 33, 93, '731 '74, 111.344;
Broadstairs House, Causewayside,
Broad Wknd, Leith, 111. 167, 210,
111. 50 "52
236,238
Brodie, Deacon, Robberies cammitted
by, I. 1 1 s r 1 5 * 116. 217,
11.23, Ill. 3t7: lantein and keys
used by I. 115 : execution of,
1. 1x5 ; herview between Bmdie
and Smith, 1. * 117; his method
of robbery 11. 23
Brodie William the sculptor, I. 159,
Brodie s klos; 1.112
Brwke, Gnsdvus V., the actor, I.
357
Brwm Stock of, I. 377
Bmugham, Lord, I. 166, 379, 11.
i11 113 157 I 287, 292.347,
111: y :his b k a a c e , I. 168; his
mother, I. 168, 242 ; burial-place
nfhisfathcr,lII. 131 ; his statue,
1. I59
Bmughton, 1.335,II.3,191,III. 151
Broughton, Barony of, 11. I&
185, 186, 366,111. 83 86 I
Bmughton Hum in 1850, 184
Broughton Hall, Ill. 88, * 93
Broughton Loan, 11. E+ 115, 176,
Broughton Park, 111. 88
Broughton Place, 11. 183, 184
Broughton Street, 11. 178, 179, 183,
11. ;30 155 ill. 68,101
I&, 186, 188
184
Broughtan T o l b t h , The, 11. * 181
Broughton loll, 111. 95
Bronnga, John, the Nevhaven
Brown CaGt. Sir ?&uel, 111. 303
Brown: George, the builder, 11. 2%
B m . Thomas. architect. 11. IOI
hsherman 111. 5 p 6
~ m m ; Rev. Alexander, irr. 75-
Brown, Rev. Dr., 111. 51
Brown Square, 1. g1.11.260,268,
269, 274 =71r 339
Broww, Dr. James, I. 190, 339,II.
1 4 314, 111. 79
Browne Dr. Thomas, 11.395
Browndll, Williim, the naval adventurer,
I I I . I ~ ,
Rrownhill, the builder, 1. 98
Brown's Chapel (Or. John), Rose
Street, 11. 15 , 184
Brown's close 1. 8: p
Brown's taveA, Lkkgate Leith
111. 914 ; singular tragedy in, ib:
Browns of Greenbank, The, I. go
Hruce Lord 11. 354
Bruce: Sir hiichael 11. 168
BNC~ of Balcaskd and Kinross,
Sir William architect of Holyrood
Palace'l. 336 11. 74, 367
Bruce. Robe;. Lord Kennrtt. 11.
242
Rruce, Robert, sword of, 111. 355
Hruce Lady 111. 158
nruce'of RiAng's mansion, I. 2-4
Bruce of Kinnaird, the traveller, 1.
247, 111,162
Brucr of Kinloss, Lady, 11. 257
Rruce of Powfoulis Mrs 11. 16a
Bruce Michael, th: Sco;;ish Kirke
White, 111. 219
B ~ c e ' s Close, I. 223
Brunstane, 11. 34
Hrunstane Rum 111. 149
Brunstane, Laid of, 111. 150
Brunstane manor-house, 111. 149,
1509 Tl579.366
Brunsmck btmt, 111. 81
Hruntan Dr. I. 79 111. 83
Brunton'Pla& 191.
Bruntsfield Links, 11. 115,137, 222,
313, 348, 111. q~ 34 31, 33, 43 ;
the avenue 111. '33
Bruntsfield dr Warrender House,
Bryce, David, thearchitect, 11. 95,
97, 154 174 210, 359, 111. 82
Rryce John architect 11. 359
Brysoh Rodert 1.37;
Yuccle;ch, D&s of, 11. 21, 86,
211, 9 3 , 318, 358, 111. 198, 2x9,
d37 265, 270, F, 30% 311, 3r4 ;
Duchessof 11.115
Bucckuch, Hemy Duke of, 11. 310
Buccleuch Lady of 1. z06
Buccleuch'Free ChArch, 11. 346
Buccleuch Place, 11. 148, a68, 347,
Bucckoch Street, II. 339
111. 45,46, *48,
Ill. '25
Buchan, Earl of, 1. 34, 11. 8 6 , s ~
1% 2% 339, 111. 2s 123, 1%
180, 314
Buchanaii, George, I. 16, 143, 167,
206, ~ 5 . *4, 11. 67. 127. 363
111. 14 179, 19. -1, 998,363.
memorial window in new Greyfriars
Church, 11. 379
Bnchanan, lk. k'raocis, botanist,
111. 1-52
Buchanan of Auchintorlie, 11.159
Buchanan Street, 111. 15
Buckingham Tenace, 119. 67
Bnckstane The 111. 342
Buildings 'in Edinburgh, Ancient
laws regulating the I. rl
Bull, Capture of Sir 'Stephen, 111.
Bullock, William ; his plan for the
re-capture of Edinburgh Castle,
202
I. 25, 26.
Bunker's Hill, I. $6
Burdiehoux, 111. 342; fossil dLcoveries
near, id. .
Burdiehouse Burn 111. 322, 339
Burgess Close, Leith, 111.164 167.
Burgh Loch,The, 11. zgc, 346, 347,
Burg Loch Brewery, 11.349
Burphmuir. The. 1. U. ~ O A . ?I&
227, 232, 234, 249
* q 9 , 354
33r 326, >a3, iiL;;
35 170 342; muster of troops
udder jam- 111. and James IV.,
Ill. 28. the k - s c a n e , 111.~8,
* z g ; :dud in 17za, 111. p;
Valleyfield House and Leven
Ledge, id.; Barclay Freechurch,
76.; Hruntsfield Links and the
Golf clubs, ib. ; Gillespie's Hospital,
111. & *37: M e r c h w
Castle, ILI. 9% P**r 26
Burghmuir, Dlstrict of the, 111. q
-y ; battle of the (see Battles)
Burghmuir-head mad, 111. 38; thc
Free Church, i6.
Burial-ground, The first, in =inburgh,
I. 149
Burials under church porticoes, 11.
247
Burke and Hare, the murderers L
Im, 11. 226-230, Ill. 27
Burleigh Lord 1.127 ; escape from
the l.oiboot$ ib.
Burn, Willkm the architect, 11.
171, 111. 34 b8 85 255
Burnet, Jamei oith: TownGuud.
11.311
Burnet, Sir Thomas, 11. 147
Burnet of Monboddo, Miss, I. iq.
111.42
Burney, Dr the musician 11. zg
Burning of'ihe Pope in ;figy by
the Universitystudents, 111. II-
13. 57
Burns, Robert, I. 3,106, 107, 11g.
IW 154 171, 178, 17% 232,236.
I Y, 159, 187, 188, wl 27, 333
2397 348, 366, 11. p4 27. 307 3%
191. 42, 55, 161, 352 ; Ftxman s
statne of, 11.88, 110; Nasmyth's
y t r a i t of, 11. @ ; monument of,
1. 11% *IIZ; bust by Brodi,
11. 110: head Or, 11. 127
Bums' centenary The first 11.150
Burns, Colonel W. Nicol, &e poet's
son 11. Sg
Burn:, Miss, and Bailie Crcech, II. '
Bnrniisland, I. 58,111.180, 188,191,
158, 159
211,314
Burtou, Ur. John Hill, I. 98, 111.
42, 43; his literary work.. 111.
'
43
able article, 11. 219
86,111. 13:
Butcher meat formerly an unsale-
Bute, Earl of, 1. 164, 179, 272, 11.
Bute, Marquis of, 11. 346
Bute's Battery, 1. 78
Butler, John, the king's carpenter,
Butter Tron, The, I. 50,
thtters of F'itlochry, %'Le, 11.
11. 136
5 218
143
Byres, Sir John, I. 153, 219, 11-GENERAL INDEX. 371
Black Watch, 11. 89, 138, 149, 179.
Black Wigs ClLb, 111. 123
Blackwood, Hnilie, 111. 15
Blackwood, William, I. 157, 291,
11. 139, 141, 142 ; the saloon in
his establinhment, 11. * 141 ; his
rrsidence, 111. 50
BfacA-wood's Mapasiw, 1. 339, 11.
322, 111. 195 288
23; ;Fa# ;2; ;7;g; 1.g WirZtors
11.140 IIP. 74
Blair,' Sir Jdmes Hunter, Lord
Provost, I. 179, 373, 376, 11. 283,
111. 89
Blair of Avontoun. Lord President.
236, 2 , II:27, 29, 120, 161, 271,
Blair Street, I. 245, 376, 11. 231,
Blarquhan Laird of 111. 36
BIair's Cl&, I. 65. & 11. 329 ;the
Duke of Gordon's house, 1. *p
Blairs of Balthayock, Tom-house
ofthe 11. 139
Blanc, kippolyte J., architect, 111.
38
Bland, the comedian, I. 342, 343
Blaw Wearie 111. 305
Bkis-sifwr, ?he gratuity, 11. 290,
383, 119. 45, 1 3 6 ~ 2 ~
Zj8,III. I
291
Blew Stone The I. 79
Blind Schdl, Cdigmillar, 11. 336
Blockhouse of St. Anthony. Leith.
111. 222, "23
J'Blue Blanket," The, I. 34, '36,
43, 11. 262, 278, 111. 55
Blumenreich, Herr, 111.88
Blyth's Close, 1. ga, 111. 66
Bmk's Land, West Port, I. 224
Boar Club The 111. IW
Board of Manuiactnres, 11. 8 3 4 6 ,
Body-snatchers Early 11. 1.w
B o ~ l l y , R o d n ci& near, 111.
Bo%l?yTower 111. 326 "328
Bonham, Sir Galter. II.'57
Bonkel Sir Edward I. 304
Bonnet'birds' club', 111.123
Bonnet-makers The 11. 265
Bonnington, n&r Le'ith, 11.~5,III.
W. ,306 ; view in, 111. * 96
Bonntngton House, 111. 88, 91,
*93, 147
Bonnington Mill, 111. 90, 247
Bonniugton Road, l I I . 8 8 , 1 2 8 , 1 ~ ,
Bonnington Sugar-refining Com-
Bonnyhaugh 111.90 gr
Bordeaux, &c de,Hr Holyrood,
Boreland homas the pcssessor of
the k&g$ stable, 11. 225; his
house I. * 80 1I.a25,n6
Bore-s&e or hare-stone, The, I.
326, 111. 28
Bomwlaski, ;he '8o?i;h dwarf, 11.
166.167
Borthwick, Lord, I. 40, 262, 11.383,
Borthwick, Jam- 11. 383
Borthwick's Close, I. 190, 211, 242
BosweIl, Sir Alexander, 1.173.182,
88, 92, 186
'7'1 '84
pany, Leith, 111. 91. 236
11. 78, 7%
Ill. 348
2x39 243.258
101, 18% 299911. 66, 143 255 339
ifs9 ; Lord hlacaulay s :pinion 01
his father and mother, 'jq; o n.wn's visit to Edinburgh,
I. z 9, IIL.57, 291, 35a
Bormll Raj, Wardte, Ill. 308
Boswell's Court, I.
Botanical gardenq, %e, I. 362,363,
Bothwell, Earfs of,' I. 94 122, 168,
Bo=vell, Jam=, I. 6 8 3 , 97, 98, 99,
111. 159, 161 162 163
196, 106, m7, 209, 2 1 0 ~ 2 4 ~ ~ 258,
259, 266, 276, 298, 3741 11. 61, 71,
72 111. 3 6,7, 52, 6 1 , ~ ~ 174,
33; ; Lord fi arnlefs murder 111.
3-7 * marruge of Queen kary
to the Earl of, I. 219. 11. 71,
262; how Bothwell attracted the
Queen's notice, 11. 102
Rothwell, Adam, Bishop of Orkney,
I. 116, q, 11. 48, 49, 71,
181, 111. 35, 98
Bothwell, ohn Lord, 11. 49
Hothwell, Air Francis, 111. 35
Hothwell, ohn I 47 158
Hothwell AichArd, PAvost of Kirk-
Bothwell of Glencorse, Henry, I. pa
Bothwell Bridge, 11. 39, 87. 375
Bottle House Company, Leith, 111.
Bough, Samuel, the artist, 11. 86,
Boulder, Gigantic, 11. 312
Bourse, The, Leith, 111. 231; its
other names, ib.
Bower, the historian of Edinburgh
University, 111. 8, 9. 10. 11, 16,
of-Fielh, 111. 2
239
Ill. 68
. .
18 19, 308
BokFoot, The, 11. 13'
Rowfoot Well. I. 310 11. 233
Bowles, Caroline, 11.'-
Boyd, Lord, 111. 174, 180
Boyd Sir Thomas nmtewn, Lord
Bo d, J o k , Slaubhter of'the ruf-
PrdVOSt 11. 284 i11.88 288
Ln. 11. a
4 4 $1, 4 ,'326, a;i, 347, fi.- . "Braid dugh Somewilk of the
Writes " 1. 315, 16
Braid, L i r d of, IIt. 49
Braid The river 111. 143, 322
Braid'Village o< 111. to, 113 ;ex*
c d o n near, 1iI. 40; its historical
asxiations, 111. 41
Braid's Row 111. 75
Braidsbum, 'I. 326, 111. 49, 61, 327
Brand, Sir Alexander, I. m3, 378,
Brandof Baberton, Alexander, 111.
Brandfield P h 11.218
Brandfield Stree; 11. ar
Braxfield, Lord, i, 173, 11. 152,153,
Bread. Sale of. determined bv law.
11.21
334
339 . . 11.;80 '
Brea&lbe Earlof 1.378 I11 146
Breadalbani Marqkis of,'II.'86;
Breadalbme Stdet. Leith. 111. ax.
Marchion& of 11. zog
. . _ _ 236
II.84,111.2 9
Breakwater,TheNewhaven III.303
Bremner, David, 1. 283, 384,
Brewers, The &inburgh, 11. 68
Brewster, Sir David, 1.379,II. 140,
f57,III. q, 242: statueof 111.24
Brilxs, Acceptance of, by'judgea
and others, 1. 163, 164, 167,169
Brickfield, 111. 144
Bridewell, The, 11. 106, IT
Bridge-end, 111. 58
Bridges, Sir Egerton, I. 273
Bridges David, cloth merchnot,
Bright, John, M.P., 11. 284
Brighton Chapel, 11. 326
Brighton Place, Portobello 111.148
Hrlsbane, Sir T., Father d 11. 199
Bristo, 11. 135, 267, w, Ilt. 94
Bristo Park 11. 326
Bristo Port,'I. 38, 11. 234, 267, 316,
T3t.3249 325, 3 4 '32% 3Pp 379,
Brisro Street, I. 335, 11. 326.327,
I. I ~ ' - I I O ; his wife, I. 110
11. 94, 156
British Convention, The, 11. 236 ;
British Linen Company, I. a79.280,
11s governors and patrons, 1. 279
British Linen Co.'s Bank, Edinburgh
11 170 171, 172; at
Leith'III'z38 '23
British h e ; Hail, &nongate, 11.
31, 33, 83
xilure of its members, id.
355, 11. 33, 93, '731 '74, 111.344;
Broadstairs House, Causewayside,
Broad Wknd, Leith, 111. 167, 210,
111. 50 "52
236,238
Brodie, Deacon, Robberies cammitted
by, I. 1 1 s r 1 5 * 116. 217,
11.23, Ill. 3t7: lantein and keys
used by I. 115 : execution of,
1. 1x5 ; herview between Bmdie
and Smith, 1. * 117; his method
of robbery 11. 23
Brodie William the sculptor, I. 159,
Brodie s klos; 1.112
Brwke, Gnsdvus V., the actor, I.
357
Brwm Stock of, I. 377
Bmugham, Lord, I. 166, 379, 11.
i11 113 157 I 287, 292.347,
111: y :his b k a a c e , I. 168; his
mother, I. 168, 242 ; burial-place
nfhisfathcr,lII. 131 ; his statue,
1. I59
Bmughton, 1.335,II.3,191,III. 151
Broughton, Barony of, 11. I&
185, 186, 366,111. 83 86 I
Bmughton Hum in 1850, 184
Broughton Hall, Ill. 88, * 93
Broughton Loan, 11. E+ 115, 176,
Broughton Park, 111. 88
Broughton Place, 11. 183, 184
Broughton Street, 11. 178, 179, 183,
11. ;30 155 ill. 68,101
I&, 186, 188
184
Broughtan T o l b t h , The, 11. * 181
Broughton loll, 111. 95
Bronnga, John, the Nevhaven
Brown CaGt. Sir ?&uel, 111. 303
Brown: George, the builder, 11. 2%
B m . Thomas. architect. 11. IOI
hsherman 111. 5 p 6
~ m m ; Rev. Alexander, irr. 75-
Brown, Rev. Dr., 111. 51
Brown Square, 1. g1.11.260,268,
269, 274 =71r 339
Broww, Dr. James, I. 190, 339,II.
1 4 314, 111. 79
Browne Dr. Thomas, 11.395
Browndll, Williim, the naval adventurer,
I I I . I ~ ,
Rrownhill, the builder, 1. 98
Brown's Chapel (Or. John), Rose
Street, 11. 15 , 184
Brown's close 1. 8: p
Brown's taveA, Lkkgate Leith
111. 914 ; singular tragedy in, ib:
Browns of Greenbank, The, I. go
Hruce Lord 11. 354
Bruce: Sir hiichael 11. 168
BNC~ of Balcaskd and Kinross,
Sir William architect of Holyrood
Palace'l. 336 11. 74, 367
Bruce. Robe;. Lord Kennrtt. 11.
242
Rruce, Robert, sword of, 111. 355
Hruce Lady 111. 158
nruce'of RiAng's mansion, I. 2-4
Bruce of Kinnaird, the traveller, 1.
247, 111,162
Brucr of Kinloss, Lady, 11. 257
Rruce of Powfoulis Mrs 11. 16a
Bruce Michael, th: Sco;;ish Kirke
White, 111. 219
B ~ c e ' s Close, I. 223
Brunstane, 11. 34
Hrunstane Rum 111. 149
Brunstane, Laid of, 111. 150
Brunstane manor-house, 111. 149,
1509 Tl579.366
Brunsmck btmt, 111. 81
Hruntan Dr. I. 79 111. 83
Brunton'Pla& 191.
Bruntsfield Links, 11. 115,137, 222,
313, 348, 111. q~ 34 31, 33, 43 ;
the avenue 111. '33
Bruntsfield dr Warrender House,
Bryce, David, thearchitect, 11. 95,
97, 154 174 210, 359, 111. 82
Rryce John architect 11. 359
Brysoh Rodert 1.37;
Yuccle;ch, D&s of, 11. 21, 86,
211, 9 3 , 318, 358, 111. 198, 2x9,
d37 265, 270, F, 30% 311, 3r4 ;
Duchessof 11.115
Bucckuch, Hemy Duke of, 11. 310
Buccleuch Lady of 1. z06
Buccleuch'Free ChArch, 11. 346
Buccleuch Place, 11. 148, a68, 347,
Bucckoch Street, II. 339
111. 45,46, *48,
Ill. '25
Buchan, Earl of, 1. 34, 11. 8 6 , s ~
1% 2% 339, 111. 2s 123, 1%
180, 314
Buchanaii, George, I. 16, 143, 167,
206, ~ 5 . *4, 11. 67. 127. 363
111. 14 179, 19. -1, 998,363.
memorial window in new Greyfriars
Church, 11. 379
Bnchanan, lk. k'raocis, botanist,
111. 1-52
Buchanan of Auchintorlie, 11.159
Buchanan Street, 111. 15
Buckingham Tenace, 119. 67
Bnckstane The 111. 342
Buildings 'in Edinburgh, Ancient
laws regulating the I. rl
Bull, Capture of Sir 'Stephen, 111.
Bullock, William ; his plan for the
re-capture of Edinburgh Castle,
202
I. 25, 26.
Bunker's Hill, I. $6
Burdiehoux, 111. 342; fossil dLcoveries
near, id. .
Burdiehouse Burn 111. 322, 339
Burgess Close, Leith, 111.164 167.
Burgh Loch,The, 11. zgc, 346, 347,
Burg Loch Brewery, 11.349
Burphmuir. The. 1. U. ~ O A . ?I&
227, 232, 234, 249
* q 9 , 354
33r 326, >a3, iiL;;
35 170 342; muster of troops
udder jam- 111. and James IV.,
Ill. 28. the k - s c a n e , 111.~8,
* z g ; :dud in 17za, 111. p;
Valleyfield House and Leven
Ledge, id.; Barclay Freechurch,
76.; Hruntsfield Links and the
Golf clubs, ib. ; Gillespie's Hospital,
111. & *37: M e r c h w
Castle, ILI. 9% P**r 26
Burghmuir, Dlstrict of the, 111. q
-y ; battle of the (see Battles)
Burghmuir-head mad, 111. 38; thc
Free Church, i6.
Burial-ground, The first, in =inburgh,
I. 149
Burials under church porticoes, 11.
247
Burke and Hare, the murderers L
Im, 11. 226-230, Ill. 27
Burleigh Lord 1.127 ; escape from
the l.oiboot$ ib.
Burn, Willkm the architect, 11.
171, 111. 34 b8 85 255
Burnet, Jamei oith: TownGuud.
11.311
Burnet, Sir Thomas, 11. 147
Burnet of Monboddo, Miss, I. iq.
111.42
Burney, Dr the musician 11. zg
Burning of'ihe Pope in ;figy by
the Universitystudents, 111. II-
13. 57
Burns, Robert, I. 3,106, 107, 11g.
IW 154 171, 178, 17% 232,236.
I Y, 159, 187, 188, wl 27, 333
2397 348, 366, 11. p4 27. 307 3%
191. 42, 55, 161, 352 ; Ftxman s
statne of, 11.88, 110; Nasmyth's
y t r a i t of, 11. @ ; monument of,
1. 11% *IIZ; bust by Brodi,
11. 110: head Or, 11. 127
Bums' centenary The first 11.150
Burns, Colonel W. Nicol, &e poet's
son 11. Sg
Burn:, Miss, and Bailie Crcech, II. '
Bnrniisland, I. 58,111.180, 188,191,
158, 159
211,314
Burtou, Ur. John Hill, I. 98, 111.
42, 43; his literary work.. 111.
'
43
able article, 11. 219
86,111. 13:
Butcher meat formerly an unsale-
Bute, Earl of, 1. 164, 179, 272, 11.
Bute, Marquis of, 11. 346
Bute's Battery, 1. 78
Butler, John, the king's carpenter,
Butter Tron, The, I. 50,
thtters of F'itlochry, %'Le, 11.
11. 136
5 218
143
Byres, Sir John, I. 153, 219, 11- ... 325, 3 4 '32% 3Pp 379, Brisro Street, I. 335, 11. 326.327, I. I ~ ' - I I O ; his wife, I. ...

Book 6  p. 371
(Score 0.89)

North Bridge.] THE ORPHAN HOSPITAL 359
c
CHAPTER XLVI:
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (concZdeJJ.
The Old Orphan Hospital-Its Foundation. Object, and Removal-Lady Glenorchy?s Chapel-Her Disputes with the Presbytery-Dr. SnelI
Jones-Demolition of the Chapel and School-Old Physic Gardens Formed-The Gardens-Sir Andrew Balfm-James Sutherland-
Inundated in x68pSutherland?s Efforts to Improve the Gardcn-Professor Hope.
ABOUT IOO feet east of the bridge, and the same
distance south of the theatre which Whitefield
to his dismay saw built in the park of the Orphan
Hospital, stood the latter edifice, the slender,
pointed spire of which was a conspicuous object in
this quarter of the city.
A hospital for the maintenance and education
of orphan children was originally designed by Mr.
Andrew Gardiner, merchant, and some other
citizens, in 1732. The suggestion met with the
approval of the Society for the Propagation of
Christian Knowledge, then located in what was
anciently named Bassandyne?s Close ; and it was
moreover assisted by liberal subscriptions and
collections at the church doors. At first a house
was hired, and thirty orphans placed in it. According
to Maitland, in November, 1733, the
hospital was founded; it stood 340 feet northwest
of the Trinity College Church, and in its
formation a part of the burial ground attached to
the latter was used.
In 1738 the Town Council granted the hospital
a seal of cause, and in 1742 they obtained royal
letters patent creating it a corporation, by which
most of the Scottish officers of State, and the heads
of different societies in Edinburgh, are constituent
members. This chanty is so extensive in its
benevolence, that children from any part of the
British Empire have the right of admission, SO far
as the funds will admit-indigence, and the
number of children in a poor family being the
None, however, are admitted under the age of
seven, or retained after they are past fourteen, as
at that time of life the managers are seldom at a
loss to dispose of them, ?the young folks,? says
Arnot, ? choosing to follow trades, and the public
entertaining so good an opinion of the manner in
which they have been brought up, that manufacturers
and others are very ready to take them into
their employment. There are about,? he adds, in
1779, ?one hundred orpham maintained in this
hospital.?
This number was increased in 1781, when Mr.
Thomas Tod, merchant in Edinburgh, became
treasurer. It was then greatly enlarged for the
better accommodation of the children, ?? and to
enable them to perform a variety of work, from the
. best title to it.
produce of which the expenses of their education
and maintenance were lessened, and healthy and
cheerful exercise furnished, suitable to their years.?
It is remarkable,? says Kincaid, ? that from
January, 1784, to January, 1787, out of from 130 to
140 young children not one has died. A particular
account of the rise, progress, present state,
and intended enlargement of this hospital was
publisted by the treasurer (Mr. Tod), wherein is a
print of the elevation, with two wings,.which the
managers intend to build so soon as the funds will
permit, when there will be room for zoo orphans.?
In its slender spire hung two bells, and therein
also stood the ancient clock of the Netherbow
Port, now in use at the Dean.
The revenues were inconsiderable, and it was
chiefly supported by benefactions and collections
made at the churches in the city. Howard, the
philanthropist, who visited it more than once, and
made himself acquainted with the constitution and
management of this hospital, Acknowledged it to be
one of the best and most useful charities in Europe.
A portrait of him hangs in the new Orphan Hospital
at the Dean, the old building we have described
having been removed in 1845 by the operations
of the North British Railway, and consequently
being now a thing of the past, like the chapel of
Lady Glenorchy, which shared the same fate at the
same time.
This edifice stood in the low ground, between
the Orphan Hospital and the Trinity College
Church, about 300 feet eastward of the north arch
of the Bridge.
Wilhelmina Maxwell, Viscountess Dowaget of
John Viscount Glenorchy, who was a kind of
Scottish Countess of Huntingdon in her day, was
the foundress of this chapel, which was a plain,
lofty stone building, but neatly fitted up- within
with two great galleries, that ran round the sides
of the edifice, and was long a conspicuous object
to all who crossed the Bridge. It was seated for
2,000 persons, and the middle was appropriated to
the poor, who sat there gratis to the number of
some hundreds. ?? Whether,? says Arnot, ?before
Lady Glenorchy founded this institution there were
churches sufficient for accommodating the inhabitants
we shall not pretend to determine. Such,
indeed, is the demand for seats, and so little arg ... Bridge.] THE ORPHAN HOSPITAL 359 c CHAPTER XLVI: EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (concZdeJJ. The Old Orphan ...

Book 2  p. 359
(Score 0.88)

ran?s family were too rich to be bribed, and
clamoured that they would have blood for blood.
On the other hand, ?friends threatened death to
a l l the people of Edinburgh if they did.the child
any harm, saying they were not wise who meddled
with scholars, especially gentlemen?s sons,? and Lord
Sinclair, as chief of the family to which the young
culprit belonged, moved boldly in his behalf, and
procured the intercession of King James with the
magistrates, and in the end all the accused got
free, including the slayer of the Bailie, who lived to
become Sir William Sinclair of hfey, in 1631, and
the husband of Catharine ROSS, of Balnagowan,
and from them the present Earls of Caithness are
descended.
When the brother of the Queen Consort, the
Duke of Holstein, visited Edinburgh in March,
t593, and as Moyse tells us, ?was received and
welcomed very gladly by Her Majesty, and used
every way like a prince,? after sundry entertainments
at Holyrood, Ravensheugh, and elsewhere,
a grand banquet was given him in the house of
the late Bailie Macmorran by the city of Edmburgh.
The King and Queen were present, ? with
great solemnity and merriness,? according to Birrel.
On the 3rd of June the Duke embarked at Leith,
under a salute of sixty pieces of cannon from the
bulwarks, and departed with his gifts, to Wit-1,ooo
five-pound pieces and 1,000 crowns, a hat and
string valued at IZ,OOO pounds (Scots?), and many
rich chains and jewels.
The Bailie?s initials, I. M., are on the pediments
that ornament his house, which after passing
through several generations of his surname, became
the residence of Sir John Clerk of Penicuik.
?By him,? says Wilson, ?it was sold to Sir
Roderick Mackenzie, of Preston Hall, appointed
tr senator of the College of Justice in 1702, who
resided in the upper part of the house at the same
time that Sir John Mackenzie Lord Royston, third
son of the celebrated Earl of Cromarty, one of the
wittiest and most gifted men of his time, occupied
the low flat. Here, in all probability, his witty
and eccentric daughter Anne was born and brought
up. This lady, who married Sir William Dick of
Prestonfield, carried her humorous pranks to an
excess scarcely conceivable in our decorous days j
sallying out occasionally in search of adventures,
like some of the maids of honour of Charles II.?s
Court, dressed in male attire, with. her maid for a
squire. She seems to have possessed more wit
than discretion.? Riddell?s Close was of old an
eminently aristocratic quarter.
Lower down the street Fisher?s Close adjoined
it, and therein stood, till 1835, the residence of the
ducal house of Buccleuch, which was demolished
in that year to make way for Victoria Terrace. On
the east side of an open court, beyond the Roman
Eagle Hall-a beautiful specimen of an ancient
saloon-stood the mansion of William Little of
Craigmillar (bearing the date 1570)~ whose brother
Clement was the founder of the university library,
for in 1580, when commissary of the city, he bequeathed
?to Edinburgh and the Kirk of God,?
all his books, 300 volumes in number. These
were chiefly theologicaL works, and were transferred
by the town council td the university. Clement
Little was not without having a share in the
troubles of those days, and on the 28th of April,
1572, with others, he was proclaimed at the market
cross, and deprived of his office, for rebellion against
Queen Mary ; but the proclamation failed to be put
in force. His son was Provost of the city in 1591.
Clement and William Little were buried in the
Greyfriars? churchyard, where a great-grandson of
the latter erected a tomb to their memory in 1683.~
Little?s Close appears as Lord Cullen?s in Edgar?s
map of 1742, so there had also resided that famous
lawyer and judge, Sir Francis Grant of Cullen, who
joined the Revolution party in 1688, who distinguished
himself in the Convention of 1689 by his
speech in favour of confemng the cram of Scotland
on William and Mary of Orange, and thus swayed
the destinies of the nation. He was raised to the
bench in 1709. His friend Wodrow has recorded
the closing scene of his active life in this old alley,
on the 16th of March, 1726. ?Brother,? said the
old revolutionist, to one who informed him that
his illness was mortal, ?you have brought me the
best news ever I heard ! ? ?? And,? adds old Robert
Wodrow, ?that day when he died was without a
czoud.?
_-
Menteth?s ??Iheatrc of Mortality.?? Eh, 1704. ... family were too rich to be bribed, and clamoured that they would have blood for blood. On the other hand, ...

Book 1  p. 111
(Score 0.88)

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